John Adams says you’re two days late

Updated
John Adams says you're two days late
John Adams says you're two days late
Massachusetts Historical Society

From a letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, July 3, 1776:

Time has been given for the whole People, maturely to consider the great Question of Independence and to ripen their judgments, dissipate their Fears, and allure their Hopes, by discussing it in News Papers and Pamphletts, by debating it, in Assemblies, Conventions, Committees of Safety and Inspection, in Town and County Meetings, as well as in private Conversations, so that the whole People in every Colony of the 13, have now adopted it, as their own Act. – This will cement the Union, and avoid those Heats and perhaps Convulsions which might have been occasioned, by such a Declaration Six Months ago.

But the Day is past. The Second Day of July 1776, will be the most memorable Epocha, in the History of America.

Hey, how was he supposed to know we’d celebrate the day of the Declaration’s adoption instead? He was pretty close on the celebration part too:

I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival. It ought to be commemorated, as the Day of Deliverance by solemn Acts of Devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.

And also the championing of belts of Mustard through gorging upon bread-wrapped slender tubes of salted processed Meat!

After the jump, the passage from the 1826 Thomas Jefferson letter that I know someone is going to share in the comments as soon as they read the “solemn Acts of Devotion to God Almighty” bit in the above quote:

From Thomas Jefferson’s reply to being invited to the celebration in Washington of the 50th anniversary (1826) of the Declaration of Independence

May it be to the world, what I believe it will be, (to some parts sooner, to others later, but finally to all,) the signal of arousing men to burst the chains under which monkish ignorance and superstition had persuaded them to bind themselves, and to assume the blessings and security of self-government. That form which we have substituted, restores the free right to the unbounded exercise of reason and freedom of opinion. All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately, by the grace of God. These are grounds of hope for others. For ourselves, let the annual return of this day forever refresh our recollections of these rights, and an undiminished devotion to them.

John Adams says you're two days late

Updated