‘It was an attack against the American public and our democratic use of the streets.’

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Amby Burfoot, center.
Amby Burfoot, center.
RunnersWorld photo

“We have used our public roadways for annual parades, protest marches, presidential inaugurations, marathons, and all manner of other events. The roads belong to us, and their use represents an important part of our free and democratic tradition.

“I trust and believe that will not change in the future–not in Boston, not at the Boston Marathon, and not at other important public events. Yes, we must be ever-vigilant. We can not cover our eyes and ears, and pretend violent acts don’t threaten our great institutions.

“But our institutions did not become great by following a path of timidity and cowardice. And we can only hope that, when pummeled, as the Boston Marathon was today, they will rise again, stronger than ever.”

– Amby Burfoot, editor-at-large, Runner’s World, and winner of the 1968 Boston Marathon (and a guest on our show tonight).

Also from Runner’s World: This from Roger Robinson:

“Marathon running is a sport of goodwill. It’s the only sport in the world where if a competitor falls, the others around will pick him or her up. It’s the only sport in the world open to absolutely everyone, regardless of gender, age, ethnicity or any other division you can think of. It’s the only occasion when thousands of people assemble, often in a major city, for a reason that is totally peaceful, healthy and well-meaning. It’s the only sport in the world where no one ever boos anybody.” 

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Boston

'It was an attack against the American public and our democratic use of the streets.'

Updated