Friday’s Campaign Round-Up, 4.29.16

Updated
Today’s installment of campaign-related news items from across the country.
 
* Any minute now, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R) will reportedly endorse Ted Cruz’s presidential campaign.
 
* At an event in Oregon yesterday, Bernie Sanders started talking up some of the changes he’d like to see in the electoral process, including open primaries in every state and automatic voter registration. Though some of these fall outside the Democratic National Committee’s purview, expect a related push in the debate over the party’s platform.
 
* This keeps happening: “Ted Cruz got crushed in Virginia on primary day, but even Donald Trump’s forces believe he’s about to stuff the state’s national convention delegation full of supporters anyway.”
 
* Though Sanders still hopes to prevail in Indiana next week, his campaign is scaling back its ad budget. Hillary Clinton, meanwhile, has stopped advertising in upcoming primaries altogether.
 
* The latest primary poll in Oregon shows Donald Trump leading the GOP pack with 43%, followed by Ted Cruz at 26% and John Kasich at 17%. Note, the “deal” announced this week between the Cruz and Kasich camps was based in part on the assumption that Kasich was positioned to do well in Oregon.
 
* On a related note, Cruz yesterday downplayed the existence of a deal with Kasich.
 
* By the end of March, the Sanders campaign had spent “nearly $166 million,” which the Washington Post reported created “a financial windfall for his team of Washington consultants.”
 
* It took a surprisingly long time, but Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) yesterday finally agreed to forgo a donation from disgraced former House Speaker Dennis Hastert. The Missouri Republican gave the contribution he received from Hastert to a local charity.
 
* In North Carolina, PPP’s latest survey points to a competitive U.S. Senate race, with incumbent Sen. Richard Burr (R) leading Deborah Ross (D), 40% to 36%. Libertarian Sean Haugh is third with 7%.
 
* In New Jersey, Gov. Chris Christie’ (R) approval rating has fallen to 26% in a new Rutgers-Eagleton Poll. That’s roughly in line with Richard Nixon’s approval rating at the height of Watergate.
 
 
 

Friday's Campaign Round-Up, 4.29.16

Updated