File Photo: Betsy DeVos testifies before the Senate Health, Education and Labor Committee confirmation hearing to be next Secretary of Education on Capitol...
YURI GRIPAS

Betsy DeVos hasn't changed her mind about education

— Updated
Betsy DeVos' nomination to lead the Department of Education was one of the most contentious confirmation fights Americans have seen in a while, but despite bipartisan opposition, she was narrowly confirmed anyway -- thanks to a tie-breaking vote from Vice President Mike Pence.

Her brief tenure thus far hasn't been much smoother. DeVos has faced a variety of protests since taking over as the nation's Education Secretary, and like much of the Trump administration, the Michigan Republican believes it's best to dismiss her critics as being part of a conspiracy against her. "I don't think most of those are spontaneous, genuine protests," DeVos told a conservative website last week. "I think they're all being sponsored and very carefully planned."

She's offered no evidence, only her assumptions.

At the same time, DeVos is also sticking to her far-right views on education policy, despite her new job. Axios asked the megadonor/cabinet secretary last week if, in her ideal world, the federal government would have any role in education. She replied:

"It would be fine with me to have myself worked out of a job, but I'm not sure that -- I'm not sure that there will be a champion movement in Congress to do that."
Oh. So, the nation's Education Secretary, even now, isn't sure the position she now holds should exist -- apparently because she's still not on board with the idea of having a federal Department of Education, which she now leads.

The quote made it sound as if DeVos is simply waiting for Congress to follow through on the far-right vision she embraced before her confirmation hearing.

In the same interview, she conceded that federal policymakers have, in the past, played a constructive role in protecting students, but when Axios asked if there any remaining issues on which the federal government should intervene, DeVos had a fairly straightforward answer.

"I can't think of any now," she replied.

Those hoping DeVos might moderate her views a bit now that she's in a position of authority are likely to be disappointed.