Airplane windows are sealed for a reason

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Airplane windows are sealed for a reason
Airplane windows are sealed for a reason
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There was a scary ordeal in Colorado on Friday, where a private plane carrying Ann Romney was forced to make an emergency landing after the cabin filled with smoke. The incident was reportedly caused by an electrical fire, and fortunately, no one was hurt.

While I’m sure it was upsetting for everyone involved, I’m not sure what to make of Mitt Romney’s reaction to the incident (thanks to E.R. for the tip).

“I appreciate the fact that she is on the ground, safe and sound. And I don’t think she knows just how worried some of us were,” Romney said. “When you have a fire in an aircraft, there’s no place to go, exactly, there’s no – and you can’t find any oxygen from outside the aircraft to get in the aircraft, because the windows don’t open. I don’t know why they don’t do that. It’s a real problem.”

Now, I don’t have any background in aeronautical engineering, but I’ve been in a few airplanes and I have a rudimentary understanding of how air pressure works.

And I’m pretty sure Jed Lewison has this right: “Yeah, great question Mitt. I mean, wouldn’t it be awesome to be able to crack the window when you’re at 35,000 feet? You know, get a taste of that 500+ mile per hour breeze? It’d be like the mile-high club for Seamus, with the added benefit of asphyxiation induced by the low oxygen levels at cruising altitude – assuming that you manage to avoid having the plane rip apart due to the sudden loss of cabin pressure.”

Maybe Romney was trying to be funny – the article doesn’t note anything about his tone – but even if one assumes this was some sort of joke, it’s also odd to think he would kid around about his wife being on a burning airplane.

Mitt Romney

Airplane windows are sealed for a reason

Updated