An agenda for those with short attention spans

Updated
 
An agenda for those with short attention spans
An agenda for those with short attention spans
Associated Press

One of the principal Republican talking points on health care in 2010 was that the Affordable Care Act must be awful – it’s written on a lot of pages.

In 2011, Herman Cain took this sentiment to the next logical level during his presidential campaign, promising voters, “I am only going to allow small bills – three pages.”

Yesterday, House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) kept this line of thinking alive, calling for a shorter platform.

“If it were up to me, I’d have a platform on one sheet of paper,” said Boehner during a media lunch sponsored by the Christian Science Monitor. He added: “Have you ever met anybody who has read the party platform? I’ve never met anybody.”

A change might make it more attractive to Americans, he added. “We ought to have a one page party platform, that way Americans might actually read it.”

I can see the slogans now: “Vote Republican: We Won’t Burden You With Lots Of Words Or Depth.”

Isn’t the idea of a platform to offer the public some kind of blueprint of what a party intends to do if given power? It’s not a blog post; there’s nothing wrong with going into detail.

As for the platform itself, Molly Redden had a good piece on leaked drafts of the platform, and highlighted six of the “most curious” items in the document (which, thankfully, runs more than one page). It’s worth a look.

John Boehner

An agenda for those with short attention spans

Updated