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Joni Ernst, Iowa Republican Senate candidate, campaigns at the 2014 Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa, Aug. 8, 2014.

Second Amendment remedies, 2014 style

10/23/14 09:04AM

In the 2010 midterms, Republican Senate hopeful Sharron Angle used a chilling phrase as part of her political vision: "Second Amendment remedies." In context, Angle argued that if U.S. policymakers pursued an agenda the far-right disapproved of, Americans may have to turn to armed violence against their own country.
 
The Republican candidate lost her Senate bid, and most of this talk receded to the fringes of right-wing politics.
 
It did not, however, disappear entirely from the Republicans' rhetorical quiver. Sam Levine had this report overnight.
Joni Ernst, the Republican candidate for U.S. Senate in Iowa, said during an NRA event in 2012 that she would use a gun to defend herself from the government.
 
"I have a beautiful little Smith & Wesson, 9 millimeter, and it goes with me virtually everywhere," Ernst said at the NRA and Iowa Firearms Coalition Second Amendment Rally in Searsboro, Iowa. "But I do believe in the right to carry, and I believe in the right to defend myself and my family -- whether it's from an intruder, or whether it's from the government, should they decide that my rights are no longer important."
In the United States, if we believe our rights are being violated by the state, we turn to the courts. In Joni Ernst's world, if we believe our rights are being violated by the state, we turn to guns.
 
This comes on the heels of a report showing Ernst expressing support for arresting federal officials who try to implement federal laws the far-right doesn't like. Noting the two radical positions, Jamison Foser joked, "First Joni Ernst wants to arrest government employees, now she wants to shoot them?"

Jobless claims climb, but remain low overall

10/23/14 08:38AM

After last week's extraordinary report on initial unemployment claims, this week's data was bound to be at least a little disappointing. But the fact remains that figures like these remain quite encouraging in the larger context.
The number of people who applied for U.S. unemployment benefits rose by 17,000 last week to 283,000, but initial claims remained below the key 300,000 level for the sixth straight week to reflect the low level of layoffs taking place in the economy. Economists polled by MarketWatch had expected claims to rise to a seasonally adjusted 285,000 in the week ended Oct. 18.
 
The average of new claims over the past month, meanwhile, fell by 3,000 to 281,000 to mark the lowest level in 14 years, the Labor Department said Thursday. The four-week average reduces seasonal volatility in the weekly data and is seen as providing a more accurate snapshot of labor-market trends.
To reiterate the point I make every Thursday morning, it's worth remembering that week-to-week results can vary widely, and it's best not to read too much significance into any one report.
 
In terms of metrics, when jobless claims fall below the 400,000 threshold, it's considered evidence of an improving jobs landscape, and when the number drops below 370,000, it suggests jobs are being created rather quickly. At this point, we've been 300,000 in 10 of the last 20 weeks.
Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., arrives for the Senate Republicans' news conference to mark sixth anniversary of the original application to construct the Keystone XL pipeline project on Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014.

McConnell leads with his chin in Kentucky

10/23/14 08:00AM

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) knows the value of a strong closing message. The incumbent senator is in the midst of the toughest race of his lengthy career -- polls show him clinging to a tiny lead over Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes (D) -- and with very little time remaining, McConnell wants to sprint to the finish line with his strongest message.
 
And yet, for some reason, the longtime lawmaker has chosen to emphasize women's issues in his final pitch.
 
Team McConnell unveiled this new ad late yesterday, featuring four women speaking to the camera. For those who can't watch clips online, here's the script:
First woman: Alison Lundergan Grimes wants me to think that I'm not good enough.
 
Second woman: That I couldn't get a job, unless Washington passed more laws.
 
Third woman: That I can't graduate college, without raising your taxes.
 
Fourth woman: She wants me to believe that strong women and strong values are incompatible.
 
Third woman: She thinks I'll vote for the candidate who looks like me.
 
First woman: Rather than the one who represents me.
After they say they're voting for McConnell, the first woman says "he believes in me."
 
This is the sort of ad a politician runs if he's convinced voters just aren't very bright.
 
Part of the problem, of course, is that McConnell is a poor messenger for a weak message. He is, after all, the same senator who opposed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay, voted repeatedly to kill the Violence Against Women Act, rejected the Paycheck Fairness Act, and voted to restrict contraception access. Closing the campaign with a discussion about women's issues seems like an odd choice.

War memorial and other headlines

10/23/14 07:59AM

Canadian MPs to meet at National War Memorial this morning before Parliament resumes. (CBC)

Meet the Sergeant at Arms who stopped the Parliament attacker. (USA Today)

Justice Department condemns Ferguson leaks as effort to influence opinion. (L.A. Times)

That Ginsburg dissent that she stayed up all night to write contained an error; the acknowledgment of it is apparently rare and important. (NY Times)

3 states deny gay unions despite appellate rulings. (AP)

Rand Paul to lay out foreign policy vision. (Politico)

Don't forget the partial solar eclipse today. (NBC News)

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Canadians confront terror threat from within

Canadians confront terror threat from within

10/22/14 11:12PM

Charlie Angus, member of the Canadian Parliament, talks with Rachel Maddow about his experience being inside the Parliament building during today's deadly shooting, and the need for a measured reaction given the domestic nature of the shooter. watch

Ebola survival stories are welcome good news

Ebola survival stories are welcome good news

10/22/14 11:00PM

Rachel Maddow reports that Amber Vinson, the second nurse to contract Ebola in the U.S., has tested free of the Ebola virus, and Ashoka Mukpo, the freelance journalist working for NBC, is getting reacquainted with his life after recovering from the... watch

Duration of Ottawa lockdown raises questions

Duration of Ottawa lockdown raises questions

10/22/14 10:49PM

Lee Anne Goodman, national affairs reporter with the Canadian Press, talks with Rachel Maddow about the latest details in the deadly shooting at the Canadian Parliament building and why authorities appear to know more than they've said publicly. watch

Shooting comes with Canada already on alert

Shooting comes with Canada already on alert

10/22/14 10:41PM

Rachel Maddow looks at the past few weeks leading up to the deadly shooting Ottawa, Ontario in Canada, with Canadian authorities on particularly heightened alert over terror concerns, and a previous attack by someone on their watch list. watch

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