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E.g., 9/19/2014
E.g., 9/19/2014

Regional differences on children, corporal punishment

09/19/14 09:32AM

Among the many recent controversies surrounding the National Football League is the case of Adrian Peterson, who was recently indicted for beating his 4-year-old son with a tree branch, which the player characterized as a form of discipline. A new NBC/Marist poll gauged public attitudes on this and related issues, and some of the results were unexpected.
 
For example, the poll asked respondents, "Do you think it is right or wrong for parents to discipline their children by striking them -- either with a paddle, switch, or belt?" Overall, 60% consider it wrong, while only 34% believe it's right. But like Judd Legum, I found the demographic differences amazing.
 
Every group of Americans, regardless of age, race, gender, education, marital status, or income felt largely the same way: striking children, respondents said, is wrong. But note what happens when the results are broken up by region:
 
It turns out, Southerners were literally the only group in the entire poll in which a majority of respondents said striking children is appropriate.
Senator John McCain speaks during a hearing in Washington

McCain vs. McCain on ground troops

09/19/14 08:48AM

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) seemed disgusted, and perhaps a little hysterical, this week when condemning President Obama for targeting Islamic State terrorists without U.S. ground troops. "It's going to take an army to beat an army," Graham told Fox News, adding, "I will not let this president suggest to the American people we can outsource our security and this is not about our safety.... This president needs to rise to the occasion before we all get killed back here at home."
 
It was of interest, then, when Amanda Terkel reported that the South Carolina Republican, as recently as a few months ago, had effectively argued the opposite. "I don't think we need boots on the ground," Graham told Fox News on June 10. "I don't think that is an option worth consideration."
 
Now that President Obama agrees with Lindsey Graham I, Lindsey Graham II is outraged.
 
But as it turns out, the South Carolinian isn't alone. This week, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) has been in high dudgeon, demanding a more expansive U.S. military operation against ISIS in Syria, though a Democratic source alerted me overnight to comments McCain made to msnbc's Andrea Mitchell on June 13.
"I think you have to explain to the American people what kind of a threat that an ISIS takeover of Iraq would pose to the United States of America. Can you imagine a caliphate or a center of violent Muslim extremism dedicated to attacking the United States, the consequences of that? That has to be explained to the American people.
 
"I would also explain to the American people that I do not envision a scenario where ground combat troops are on the ground."
A few moments later, McCain added, "I would not commit to putting Americans boots on the ground."
 
This sounds awfully similar to what the president is saying now, to McCain's great consternation.
U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts makes his victory speech at a Johnson County Republican's election watch party Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014, in Overland Park, Kan. (Photo by Charlie Riedel/AP)

Court clears way for two-man race in Kansas

09/19/14 08:00AM

In Kansas' amazing U.S. Senate race, the stage was set for the Kansas Supreme Court to have the final say. Chad Taylor (D) terminated his campaign weeks ago and wants off the ballot; brazenly partisan Secretary of State Kris Kobach (R) hopes to boost incumbent Sen. Pat Roberts (R) by forcing Taylor to stay on the ballot.
 
As expected, the state court ruled late yesterday in Taylor's favor.
The Kansas Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a Democratic Senate candidate's name be removed from the ballot ahead of November's election. [...]
 
Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach ... ruled that Taylor couldn’t withdraw his name from the ballot, citing a state law that requires candidates to be “incapable” of serving if they wish to withdraw from a race. The court settled the matter Thursday.
 
“[Kobach] shall not include Taylor’s name on any ballots for the office of United States Senate for the general election on November 4, 2014,” Judge Michael J. Malone wrote to conclude his ruling.
The entirety of the ruling, which featured no dissent, is online here (pdf).  There is no additional appeal.
 
The panic within GOP circles is understandable. Polls show Roberts, an unpopular, longtime incumbent, with a vastly better chance of success if his opposition is divided between Taylor and Independent Greg Orman. With Taylor out, Orman is fairly well positioned to win the seat.
 
But the story isn't done just yet. Secretary of State Kobach, who said the matter had to be resolved by last night in order to prepare state ballots, magically discovered* late yesterday that he could extend the deadline another eight days. To what end? As the Republican official sees it, Kansas Democrats can now be required to choose a replacement candidate to take Taylor's slot on the ballot.
 
Kobach really isn't making much of an effort to conceal his partisan agenda here. That said, this latest maneuver probably won't work, either.

The (Re)United Kingdom and other headlines

09/19/14 07:57AM

Scotland rejects independence in record-breaking vote. (NBC News)

A registered Democratic voter sues to force the party to name a new Senate nominee. (AP)

Chris McDaniel files appeal arguments in his fight to overturn his Republican primary loss in Mississippi. (AP)

GOP tries to scare donors into giving top dollar. (Time)

Administration officials discuss Obama's strategy for midterm campaigning. (Wall Street Journal)

The biggest plagiarism offenders of the 2014 election. (Washington Post)

Want to read newly declassified CIA performance reviews? (Washington Post)

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Scottish independence vote count under way

Scottish independence vote count under way

09/18/14 10:48PM

Alastair Jamieson, NBC News digital journalist reports live from Scotland as votes for and against independence are being counted and discusses whether a late push by the "no" campaign will be enough to keep the United Kingdom united. watch

Congress ducks out as US military fights ISIS

Congress ducks duty as US military engages ISIS

09/18/14 10:23PM

Rachel Maddow reports on the Senate's passage of expanding the training of Syrian rebels, and points out the abject dereliction by Congress to give itself more months off without addressing the war on ISIS while the U.S. military continues the fight. watch

Ahead on the 9/18/14 Maddow show

09/18/14 06:23PM

Tonight's guests:

  • Dave Helling, political reporter for the Kansas City Star
  • Matt Wells, US blogs and networks editor at the Guardian
  • Alastair Jamieson, reporter, editor and homepage producer for NBC News live from Scotland
  • John Wisniewski, New Jersey state representative, New Jersey legislative investigation committee co-chair

Check out a preview of tonight's show from executive producer Cory Gnazzo after the jump:

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