Why we are at war

Updated

Rachel Maddow joined us today to discuss her new book “Drift.”

With the war in Afghanistan now in its 11th year, the costs have been enormous: More than 1,800 U.S. soldiers have died, and taxpayers have spent more than $400 billion dollars on that battle alone. And yet where is the national conversation about war and why are we still in it?

In her book, Rachel argues that when you use Reservists – everyday citizens –  to fight our wars, as we did decades ago, our appetite to tolerate war is minimized. But once we got to the point where wars were easier to wage for indefinite periods, Reservists and Guardsmen stopped feeling like citizens. We think of them now the way we used to think of active duty troops: their lives are dominated by wars, and civilian lives aren’t affected anymore… except for tax cuts, which never used to happen during wartime. 

Bottom line: we are not connected enough to the men and women serving in our wars. We need an open, robust dialogue about our military.

 

Here here.

Why we are at war

Updated