Republican Senator-elect: Why the GOP could ‘cease to exist’

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Texas Republican Ted Cruz was just elected to his first term in the Senate, but he’s already talking about the end of the GOP. Cruz told the New Yorker, “In not too many years, Texas could switch from being all Republican to all Democrat….If that happens, no Republican will ever again win the White House.”

The rapidly growing population of Latinos in Texas is projected to make the group the majority by 2030. If Republicans continue to lose Hispanic voters to Democrats by landslide numbers, the Lone Star State and its 38 electoral votes could move toward the swing state column.

The problem for Republicans is that this is part of a larger, national trend. The Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza reports that, in the past six presidential elections, Democrats have averaged 327 electoral votes, while Republicans have averaged 210. As Republicans have witnessed a shrinking number of guaranteed electoral votes,  Democrats have turned more states solidly blue and made inroads in new territory.

If this trend continue, soon-to-be freshman Senator Cruz is in for a tough fight for his career and his party’s survival.

Republican Senator-elect: Why the GOP could 'cease to exist'

Updated