Are Republicans breaking ranks with Grover Norquist?

Updated
File photo: Conservative activist Grover Norquist stands in his office in Washington, Jan. 26, 2006.
File photo: Conservative activist Grover Norquist stands in his office in Washington, Jan. 26, 2006.
AP Photo/Yuri Gripas, File

He’s been called the “most powerful man in Washington,” and today he called Mitt Romney a “poopy head.” Grover Norquist believes that President Obama won, not because  voters chose his policy proposals – especially on raising taxes on the wealthy – but rather because he wasn’t a “poopy head.”

Norquist and his organization Americans for Tax reform holds the names of 279 lawmakers who have signed his pledge not to raise taxes, but some signatories are starting to change their tune. While the pledge opposes basic increases in the marginal tax rate, it also opposes eliminating deductions or tax credits unless they are “matched dollar for dollar by further reducing tax rates.” Essentially, don’t expect to bring in more money by closing loopholes and deductions because the Norquist pledge requires equal cuts in tax rates.

That promise runs counter to the suggestion by House Speaker John Boehner that Republicans are open to some revenue, as long as it comes from ending tax credits and deductions. Boehner’s position has been echoed by Republican Senators Lindsey Graham, Saxby Chambliss and Bob Corker. However, when push comes to shove, if a deal is on the table that includes any kind of revenue, from tax hikes or eliminating deductions, will Republicans break their bond with Grover Norquist?

Are Republicans breaking ranks with Grover Norquist?

Updated