President Obama’s advocacy machine

Updated
President Barack Obama points to the crowd as he arrives to speak at a campaign event at Nationwide Arena, Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio.
President Barack Obama points to the crowd as he arrives to speak at a campaign event at Nationwide Arena, Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio.
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

This week, as Donald Trump, Sarah Palin and 8,000 other Republicans roam the Beltway to capture the conservative voice at CPAC, Democratic donors are staking out their place in politics as well as they gather for Organizing for Action’s “Founders’ Summit.”

Organizing for Action is the new nonprofit successor to President Obama’s election campaign; it’s devoted to advocating his agenda, which includes of gun control, immigration reform and climate change through grassroots activism.

The group wasn’t always so grassroots.

Organizing for Action came under fire after reports surfaced that the group was accepting corporate donations and giving high-level donors special access to the White House. The group has since announced that they will no longer accept donations from corporations and will operate with full transparency.

On Thursday’s NOW with Alex Wagner, the panel discussed Organizing for Action, its fundraising tactics and whether it’s good or bad thing for President Obama and the Democrats.

President Obama’s advocacy machine

Updated