NewsNation with Tamron Hall, 8/9/13, 2:19 PM ET

Two lawyers assigned to Fort Hood shooter not in court

Two of the defense attorneys ordered to help accused Fort Hood shooter Major Nidal Hasan are not in court. This comes one day after the judge refused to let them leave the case. Professor Glenn Sulmasy from the Center for National Policy joins...

Hasan’s standby attorneys believe he wants the death penalty

Updated

“It was a horror show of epic proportions.”

That’s how Army Reserve clinical psychologist Kathy Platoni described the shooting she witnessed nearly four years ago at Texas’ Fort Hood military base. Speaking on NewsNation Friday, Platoni characterized the scene on Nov. 5, 2009, as “a holocaust.”
“It’s something that’s emblazoned on my mind, and will be for all my days to come,” she said.
Given her personal connection to the massacre that left 13 dead and 32 others wounded, Platoni said she believed a just penalty for the admitted shooter, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, would be death. That punishment may be exactly what Hasan is after.
“He’s looking to be a martyr,” said Professor Glenn Sulmasy from the Center for National Policy on NewsNation Friday. “His reasoning for not actually questioning, or cross examining, or examining any witnesses–in this case, cross examining the prosecution’s witnesses–are evidence that he really isn’t putting on a defense.”
The three military-appointed defense attorneys were placed on standby after Hasan decided that he wanted to represent himself. Now, those attorneys have asked for permission to either take over the defense or have their duties scaled back because they believe Hasan is actively seeking the death penalty. The judge refused the lawyers’ request, but they plan on appealing to a higher court, reports the Associated Press.
Only one member of the standby counsel was present in the courtroom Friday. The other two left to prepare their appeal.

Hasan's standby attorneys believe he wants the death penalty

Updated