Year of the mad men: Komen spurns Planned Parenthood

Updated
File Photo: Tamalah Williams, center, wears a breast cancer awareness T-shirt as she dances to warm up for the 20th Susan G. Komen Race for The Cure in...
File Photo: Tamalah Williams, center, wears a breast cancer awareness T-shirt as she dances to warm up for the 20th Susan G. Komen Race for The Cure in...
Kyle Kurlick/The Commercial Appeal/AP Photo, File

The Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation—best known for its “Race for the Cure” fundraising effort in the fight against breast cancer—shocked its millions of supporters at the end of January last year when it said it would stop contributing funds to Planned Parenthood for breast cancer screening.

Komen officials said the new policy prohibited grants to organizations under government investigation (an anti-abortion Republican lawmaker wanted Planned Parenthood investigated), but critics accused the breast cancer organization of caving to partisan pressure over abortion rights.

A community of Komen foundation supporters launched a grassroots campaign pressuring the group to reconsider its commitment to Planned Parenthood, which provides nearly 750,000 breast cancer screenings annually, particularly to low-income and uninsured women.

The organization’s founder Nancy Brinker spoke with msnbc’s Andrea Mitchell, a breast cancer survivor and “Race for the Cure” participant herself, on February 2, 2012. A day later,  in response to massive public pressure, the Komen foundation reversed its decision.

Watch the interview on Andrea Mitchell Reports here:

Year of the mad men: Komen spurns Planned Parenthood

Updated