Without fanfare, Romney concedes

Updated
presidential candidate Mitt Romney and his wife Ann kiss after casting their votes in the US presidential elections in Belmont, Massachusetts, November 6, 2012.
presidential candidate Mitt Romney and his wife Ann kiss after casting their votes in the US presidential elections in Belmont, Massachusetts, November 6, 2012.
Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

In a short and subdued concession speech, Mitt Romney called for leaders to “reach across the aisle” and declared, “Our principles endure.”

“I have just called President Obama to congratulate him on his victory,” Romney said, after taking the stage in Boston. “It’s a time of great challenges for America, and we pray he’ll be successful in guiding our nation.”

Romney thanked his wife, family, and campaign team, as well as his running mate Paul Ryan. “Besides my wife Ann, Paul is the best choice I have ever made.” Still, after failing to help Romney carry Wisconsin, Ryan’s stock may not have gone up.

Romney called on political leaders to find common ground. “The nation is at a very critical point at a time like this,” he said. “We can’t risk partisan posturing and political bickering.”

And he added: “We look at Democrats and Republicans in government to put people before the politics.”  Then he was joined on stage by his wife, by Ryan and his wife and children, and the Romney sons and their families. They embraced, and then walked offstage.

Without fanfare, Romney concedes

Updated