Terror in Chattanooga

  • Bill Lettmkuhl kneels by a makeshift memorial in front of near the Armed Forces Career Center on Friday, July 17, 2015, in Chattanooga, Tenn.
  • Miller-Motte Technical College students and others join in prayer across the highway from the strip mall where a gunman attacked the Armed Forces Career Center/National Guard Recruitment Office on July 17, 2015 in Chattanooga, Tenn.
  • An FBI investigator investigates the scene of a shooting outside a military recruiting center on Friday, July 17, 2015, in Chattanooga, Tenn.
  • Mourners places flags at a growing memorial in front of the Armed Forces Career Center in Chattanooga, Tenn., July 16, 2015. 
  • Chad Harris puts his face against a pew as he prays during a prayer vigil at Redemption Point Church for the victims of shootings at a recruiting center and another U.S. military site a few miles apart in Chattanooga, Tenn., July 16, 2015. Federal authorities said they were investigating the possibility it was an act of terrorism, and the FBI took charge of the case. 
  • An angel statue sits in a makeshift memorial near the scene of a shooting at a Armed Forces Career Center/National Guard recruitment office on July 16, 2015 in Chattanooga, Tenn.
  • Law enforcement perch on the rear of an armored vehicle as they prepare at a staging area on Hixson Pike to investigate a nearby home on July 16, 2015, in Chattanooga, Tenn. At least two military facilities in Tennessee were attacked in shootings Thursday. 
  • Melody Kelley, front right, hugs Logan Wallace during a prayer vigil at Redemption Point Church for the victims of shootings at a recruiting center and another U.S. military site a few miles apart in Chattanooga, Tenn., July 16, 2015.
  • In this frame from video, law enforcement officers surround a house in Hixson, Tenn., July 16, 2015. A gunman unleashed a barrage of fire at two sites a few miles apart in Chattanooga, killing several, officials said. The attacker was also killed.
  • A police officer investigates outside the Armed Forces Career Center after a gunman opened fire on the building, July 16, 2015, in Chattanooga, Tenn. Authorities say there were multiple casualties including the gunman. 
  • The windows of the Armed Forces Recruitment Center have several bullet holes from a shooting as the area is cordoned off with blue shell casing markers in the parking lot on July 16, 2015 in Chattanooga, Tenn. At least two military facilities in Tennessee were attacked in shootings Thursday.
  • FBI agents work the scene at the Armed Forces Career Center in Chattanooga, Tenn., July 16, 2015. Four Marines were killed on Thursday by a gunman who opened fire at two military offices in Chattanooga, Tennessee, before being fatally shot in an attack officials called a brazen, brutal act of domestic terrorism. 
  • FBI agents work the scene at the Armed Forces Career Center in Chattanooga, Tenn., July 16, 2015. 

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Updated

A gunman unleashed a barrage of gunfire at two military centers in Chattanooga Thursday, killing four Marines, injuring a police officer and a Marine recruiter, and critically injuring a Navy sailor, authorities said.

The gunman was killed after a shootout with police at the second facility, authorities said. It was not immediately clear whether police killed him or he killed himself.

The gunman was identified as Mohammad Youssuf Abdulazeez, 24. He was a naturalized U.S. citizen from Kuwait, a federal official said.

“It is incomprehensible to see what happened and the way individuals who proudly serve our country were treated,” Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke said.

Authorities offered no immediate information on a motive. Bill Killian, the top federal prosecutor for eastern Tennessee, said the attack was being investigated as an act of domestic terrorism.

At an 11 p.m. press conference, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam called Chattanooga “a great city with a broken heart.” Officials offered little more information about the incidents, except to say that the gunman used multiple weapons to carry out the attacks, and that no public safety concerns remained.

Read more at NBCNews.com

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