Scenes of anguish after Paris 'terrorist attack'

  • Reinforcement of France’s national security alert system ‘Vigipirate’ patrol at Gare de l’Est on January 7, 2015 in Paris. Twelve people were killed including two police officers as two gunmen opened fire at the magazine offices of Charlie Hebdo.
  • A French soldier patrols at the Montparnasse railway station in Paris, France, on Jan. 7, 2015. France reinforced security at houses of worship, stores, media offices and transportation after masked gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said.
  • Policemen stand in front of the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving twelve dead. The attackers who stormed the Paris offices of satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo on January 7, killing 12 people, shouted “we have avenged the prophet”, according to witnesses cited by a police source. In a video of the attack filmed by a man taking refuge on a nearby rooftop, the men can be heard shouting “Allahu Akbar” (God is greatest) between rounds of heavy arms fire.
  • French soldiers patrol in front of the Eiffel Tower on Jan. 7, 2015 in Paris as the capital was placed under the highest alert status after heavily armed gunmen shouting Islamist slogans stormed French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and shot dead at least 12 people in the deadliest attack in France in four decades.
  • Police officers take security measures near the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen attacked the offices leaving twelve dead, including two police officers.
  • Police officers take security measures near the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen attacked the offices leaving twelve dead, including two police officers. 
  • French investigating police officer takes photos outside the door of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo’s office, in Paris, on Jan. 7, 2015. 
  • People are evacuated outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo’s office, in Paris, on Jan. 7, 2015. 
  • An injured person is transported to an ambulance after a shooting, at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo’s office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Masked gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said. The weekly has previously drawn condemnation from Muslims.
  • An injured person is evacuated outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo’s office, in Paris, on Jan. 7, 2015.
  • People stand outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo’s office after a shooting, in Paris on Jan. 7, 2015.
  • French police officers and forensic experts examine the car used by armed gunmen who stormed the Paris offices of satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, killing 12 people, on January 7, 2015 in Paris. A source close to the investigation said two men “armed with a Kalashnikov and a rocket-launcher” stormed the building in central Paris and “fire was exchanged with security forces”. The source said a gunman had hijacked a car and knocked over a pedestrian while attempting to speed away. 
  • Firefighters carry a victim on a stretcher at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, Jan. 7, 2015.
  • French police officers and forensic experts examine the car used by armed gunmen who stormed the Paris offices of satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, killing 12 people, on January 7, 2015 in Paris. A source close to the investigation said two men “armed with a Kalashnikov and a rocket-launcher” stormed the building in central Paris and “fire was exchanged with security forces”. The source said a gunman had hijacked a car and knocked over a pedestrian while attempting to speed away. 
  • People hug each other outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo’s office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Masked gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said. The weekly has previously drawn condemnation from Muslims. 
  • Firefighters carry a victim on a stretcher at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. Eleven people were killed and 10 injured in shooting at the Paris offices of the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, already the target of a firebombing in 2011 after publishing cartoons deriding Prophet Mohammad on its cover, police spokesman said. Five of the injured were in a critical condition, said the spokesman. Separately, the government said it was raising France’s national security level to the highest notch. 
  • French far-left leader Jean-Luc Melenchon (C) reacts outside of the headquarters of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on Jan. 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving twekve dead.
  • A bullet’s impact is seen on a window at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper on Jan. 7, 2015.
  • Armed gunmen face police officers near the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on Jan. 7, 2015, during an attack on the offices of the newspaper which left eleven dead, including two police officers, according to sources close to the investigation.

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Updated

Twelve people were killed Wednesday when gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical news magazine that had published cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad. A massive manhunt is currently underway for the suspects.

France raised its terror threat level following the shooting at the offices of Charlie Hebdo in central Paris and stepped up security for media organizations, large stores and places of worship. Two police officers were among the dead and the gunmen remained at large hours after the attack, which occurred at 11:30 a.m. local time (5:30 a.m. ET).

“We will find the people who did this,” French President Francois Hollande said. “France is today shocked by this terrorist attack.”

Benoit Bringer, a journalist with Agence Premiere Ligne who saw the attack, told the iTele network he saw several masked men armed with machine guns. Television footage from the scene showed a police car with at least 10 bullet holes in the windshield.

In response to the attack, crowds gathered in Paris’s Place de la République on Wednesday evening to express solidarity with Charlie Hebdo.

Reporting by Alastair Jamieson and Florence Viala.

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