Romney backers claim independence from government while pocketing federal funds

Updated

A number of individuals featured in Mitt Romney’s campaign commercials and photo-ops denigrate the value of government aid and infrastructure, even as they receive government funds that contributed to their success.

As highlighted on Tuesday’s PoliticsNation, Jack Gilchrist, the owner of the Gilchrist Metal Fabricating Company, appears in one commercial asking why the president demonizes entrepreneurs. The New Hampshire Union Leader reports that, despite his denunciation of Obama’s remarks on the value of government support for business, Gilchrist has received millions in government money. He received $800,000 in tax-exempt revenue bonds, and a $500,000 loan from the U.S. Small Business Administration, among other payouts.

It doesn’t stop there. Several of the small business owners that Romney sat beside at a roundtable—in front of a sign that said, “We Did Build It”—have received generous treatment from the federal government. Jim Burra, who sat to Romney’s right, is the CEO of Endural, a company that has gotten $41,626 in federal contracts. Phillip Ramos, who sat to Romney’s far left, is the CEO of Philatron, which received more than $11 million in government contracts. 

Similarly, Romney visited an auto repair shop last week where he declared, “This is not the result of government. …This is the result of people who take risks, who have dreams, who build for themselves and for their families.” As it happens, the man who opened the auto repair shop started out without any funds and received a bond issued by the government.

Mitt Romney

Romney backers claim independence from government while pocketing federal funds

Updated