{{show_title_date || "Reporter's notebook: Why sexual violence stories are badly told, 12/9/14, 6:30 PM ET"}}

Reporter’s Notebook: How to cover rape

Updated

On Tuesday, December 9, msnbc hosted a live streaming discussion on the difficulties of reporting on sexual violence. After the allegations against Bill Cosby – which have drawn mea culpas from journalists who didn’t ask the star about the accusations – and the controversy over Rolling Stone’s reporting on the University of Virginia, where do we go from here? Is there an inherent conflict between journalism and victim advocacy, and are there boundaries past which rigorous reporting shouldn’t cross? And how do you do no harm while still getting the story?

MSNBC national reporter Irin Carmon moderated, along with the following guests:

Lauren Wolfe, a journalist who directs the Women Under Siege Project at the Women’s Media Center, sits on on the advisory committee of the International Campaign to Stop Rape & Gender Violence in Conflict and is the recipient of the 2012 Frank Ochberg Award for Media and Trauma Study. 

Katie J.M. Baker, a national reporter at BuzzFeed who often covers campus sexual assault. Previously she worked at Newsweek and Jezebel. You can read some of her reporting here and here

Salamishah Tillet, an associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania and co-founder of A Long Walk Home, Inc., a non-profit organization that uses art therapy and the visual and the performing arts to end violence against girls and women.

12/9/14, 6:33 PM ET

Reporter's notebook: How journalists can do better

Irin Carmon, Katie Baker and Lauren Wolfe talk about the emotional costs of reporting on sexual violence, and how journalists can do better moving forward.

12/9/14, 6:21 PM ET

Ethical, journalistic issues in Rolling Stone report

Irin Carmon, Katie Baker, Lauren Wolfe and Salamishah Tillet talk about the ethical and journalistic issues related to the Rolling Stone report on the University of Virginia.

 

 

Bill Cosby, Sexual Assault and University of Virginia

Reporter's Notebook: How to cover rape

Updated