Photos from largest ever rally in France history

  • A crowd gathers in Republique square before the demonstration, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence.
  • People gather at Place de la Nation during a rally in Paris, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015.
  • Marchers gather in Paris’s Place de la République on Jan. 11, 2014.
  • Demonstrators make their way along Place de la Republique during a mass unity rally following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week’s terrorist attacks in the country.
  • A man holds a giant pencil as he takes part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) with millions on the streets of Paris January 11, 2015. French citizens were joined by dozens of foreign leaders, among them Arab and Muslim representatives, in an unprecedented tribute to this week’s victims following the shootings by gunmen at the offices of the satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, the killing of a police woman in Montrouge, and the hostage taking at a kosher supermarket at the Porte de Vincennes. 
  • Demonstrators make their way along Place de la Republique during a mass unity rally following the recent terrorist attacks on Jan. 11, 2015 in Paris, France. 
  • Charlie Hebdo newspaper staff, with editorialist Patrick Pelloux, right, cartoonist Renald Luzier, known as Luz, left, react during a march in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015.
  • Demonstrators wave flags on the monument at the center of Republique Square before the demonstration, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence.
  • French President Francois Hollande, wearing glasses, comforts French columnist for Charlie Hebdo Patrick Pelloux as they take part with family members and relatives in a solidarity march in the streets of Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015.
  • People gather atop a statue at Place de la Nation during a rally in Paris, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015.
  • People demonstrate on Republique square with a portrait of slain Charlie Hebdo cartoonist Jean Cabut known as Cabu, during the demonstration in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015.
  • People gather atop a statue, one of them holding a giant replica pencil, at Place de la Nation during a rally in Paris, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015.
  • Demonstrators make their way along Place de la Republique during a mass unity rally following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
  • Women hold candles during the Unity rally “Marche Republicaine” on January 11, 2015 in Paris in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country’s best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents.
  • People light candles following thousands of people marching from Place de la Republique on route to Place de la Nation, following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this weeks terrorist attacks in the country.
  • A demonstrator holds a sign reading Je Suis Charlie (“I am Charlie”) at Place de la Nation during a rally in Paris, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015.
  • A couple kiss during the unity rally “Marche Republicaine” on January 11, 2015 in Paris in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country’s best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents.
  • People take part in a Unity rally Marche Republicaine on January 11, 2015 at the Place de la Nation (Nation square) in Paris in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country’s best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents.
  • People light candles during a Unity rally Marche Republicaine on January 11, 2015 at the Place de la Nation (Nation square) in Paris in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country’s best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents.
  • People are seen at the Place de la Nation as they attend a mass unity rally following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.

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Updated

Leaders from around the world Sunday joined hundreds of thousands of marchers in Paris for a rally in a show of solidarity after a series of deadly terror attacks rocked the country.

Crowds chanted “Qui vous etes? Charlie!” (Who are you? Charlie!) on Sunday as they made their way through Place de la Republique in Paris, many waving French flags. Attendees raised a giant pencil, an image that’s become a symbol of free expression in the wake of the murders. Similar rallies took place in towns and cities through the country. French media estimated Paris turnout may have been as high as 1.5 million and Agence France-Presse reported the number could be as high as 3.3 million nationally. More than 141,000 people had indicated on Facebook that they planned to attend the main Unity rally. 

For more feature photography, go to msnbc.com/photography 

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