A person stands in balloons at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Aug. 30, 2012.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Fewer Americans call themselves Republicans

Updated

The share of Americans who identify themselves as Republicans is at the lowest the party has seen in more than 25 years, according to a new poll.

Instead, more and more people consider themselves independents. On average, 42% of the public said they were independents last year, according to a Gallup poll published Wednesday. The rate is the highest for the party since the organization began polling citizens 25 years ago. Support of the Republican party simultaneously fell to 25%, the lowest number from the same time period.

GOP identification peaked in 2004 at 34% when former President George W. Bush won a second term in office. But then it fell, mostly during his final years as the country’s leader.

Participation in the Democratic party–31%–didn’t change from the past four years but is below its 36% recording when Americans first elected President Obama in 2008.

Last November, half of the country believed Republicans would have more influence over the country in 2014, according to a CNN/ORC International poll. Only 42% of the public said President Obama would wield greater influence.

The president’s credibility took a hit last year among his administration’s mishandling of the health care website rollout and leaks about the National Security Agency’s spying program. He received all-time low approval ratings.

Fewer Americans call themselves Republicans

Updated