Ferguson's 'Weekend of Resistance'

  • Lesley McSpadden, Michael Brown’s mother, visits her son’s memorial at the Canfield Green Apartment complex in Ferguson on Oct. 10, 2014. The memorial burned down on Sep. 23 but was rebuilt immediately.
  • A protester raises his fist during a nightly march toward the Ferguson Police Dept. on Oct. 10, 2014.
  • Protesters confront the police line in front of the Ferguson Police Department on Oct. 10, 2014.
  • Pallbearers carry a mock mirrored coffin during a demonstration in front of the Ferguson Police Department on Oct. 10, 2014.
  • A police officer faces protesters in front of the Ferguson Police Department building on Oct. 10, 2014.
  • Protesters chanting in front of the Ferguson Police Department during a peaceful demonstration on Oct. 11, 2014.
  • An emotional Lesley McSpadden, mother of Michael Brown, leads a march from her son’s memorial to the Ferguson Police Department on Oct 11, 2014.
  • A nightly march starting at Michael Brown’s memorial at the Canfield Green Apartment complex and ending at the Ferguson Police Department on Oct 11, 2014.
  • A grandmother with her grandson on her way to a nightly protest rally in Ferguson, Mo. on Oct. 11, 2014.
  • Protesters raising their hands chanting “Hands up, don’t shoot!” at a nightly rally in front of the Ferguson Police Department on Oct 11, 2014.
  • Lesley McSpadden, Michael Brown’s mother, leading a nightly march from her son’s memorial at the Canfield Green Apartment complex and ending at the Ferguson Police Department on Oct 11, 2014.

on Canfield and ended in front of Ferguson Police Department in Ferguson Mo., Oct. 11, 2014.
  • A mother and child walk by the Ferguson Police Department during a nightly protest on Oct. 11, 2014.
  • Ferguson resident, Martrell Hughes on a nightly vigil walk with his wife, Michelle Smith (not pictured) and their children on Oct. 9, 2014.
  • Spoken word poet and activist, Marcellus Buckley, 22, during a nightly vigil in front of Ferguson Police Dept. on Oct. 9, 2014.

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Updated

FERGUSON, Missouri  A few thousand protesters participated in a “Justice for All” march in St. Louis on Saturday, one of the largest and most diverse gatherings since activism began over the death of Michael Brown.

Unions, religious groups and student organizations gathered behind banners, holding aloft flags and posters as they marched down the street to the thundering of drums and chants of “Black lives matter! Black lives matter!”

Related: St. Louis protesters at Justice for All march: ‘Black lives matter!’

Peace-keepers and volunteers lined the march route while police officers leaned back on squad cars serving as barricades for the protest. But their precautions proved unnecessary as, for the second day in a row, the demonstrations remained non-violent.

Over 100 protesters marched peacefully down W. Florissant Ave. on Friday night carrying a mirrored coffin in Michael Brown’s honor, kicking off what organizers billed as a “Weekend of Resistance,” a multi-day event designed to pay tribute to the lives of young black men who have died at the hands of police. 

Brown was unarmed when he was shot and killed by a white police officer on Aug. 9, sparking national outrage and months of protests over racial disparities in law enforcement.

When protesters arrived at the Ferguson Police Department on Friday, they began playing hip-hop music. Some verbally confronted the 20-or-so police officers standing on the sidelines.

“If you touch a police officer, you will be charged with assault,” police warned over a megaphone. But the crowd remained mostly calm – a distinctly lower level of energy than the groups gathered in the days and weeks here after Brown’s death.

Related: Ferguson protesters rise again for Michael Brown

The vigil and march Friday night took on greater significance this week after a second shooting just 12 miles away from Ferguson tapped into the community’s frustrations and sparked yet another round of spontaneous protests. 

On Wednesday, a uniformed, off-duty police officer shot 17 bullets at 18-year-old Vonderrit Myers Jr., killing the teen on the spot after he allegedly fired three shots at the officer. According to St. Louis police, a 9mm handgun was recovered at the scene, as were the three bullets apparently fired in the direction of the officer. The teen’s family disputes the police account, saying Myers was unarmed and merely carrying a sandwich that he had bought at a local convenience store.

Photographer Zun Lee is based in Toronto and is the author of Father Figure: Exploring Alternate Notions of Black Fatherhood.

For more feature photography, go to msnbc.com/photography

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