As Ferguson readies for more protesters, a look back

  • Larry Claffy, right, of Overland and a patron of Faraci Pizza in Ferguson, Mo., has words with a protester as police move in to break up the confrontation on Sept. 30, 2014. There has been unrest in the St. Louis suburb since the Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed, black 18-year-old, by a white police officer.
  • Crowds confront police near the scene in south St. Louis where a man was fatally shot by an off-duty St. Louis police officer on Oct. 8, 2014. St. Louis Police Lt. Col. Alfred Adkins said the 32-year-old officer was working a secondary security job late Wednesday when the shooting happened.
  • The parents of Michael Brown, Lesley McSpadden (L) and Michael Brown Sr. (R), wear remembrances of their son at a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington, Sept. 25, 2014. Five people were arrested and two police officers injured in renewed violence overnight on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, sparked by a fire that destroyed a shrine to Michael Brown, a teenager killed by a police officer last month. 
  • Ribbons fly in the wind outside a burned-out gas station on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Mo., Oct. 3, 2014. The St. Louis suburb has become a place of anger, despair and resentment since the death of Michael Brown, and many here are unsure if it will recover.
  • A protester shouts at St. Louis county police officers during a protest aimed at shutting down Interstate 70 in Berkeley, Mo. on Sept. 10, 2014 near the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, Mo. where Michael Brown, an unarmed, black 18-year old was shot and killed by a white police officer on Aug. 9. 
  • A man who declined to be identified speaks loudly at the end of a meeting of the Ferguson City Council, Sept. 9, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The meeting is the first for the city council since the fatal shooting of Michael Brown by a city police officer. 
  • A customer arrives for dinner at Northland Chop Suey which remains boarded up but open for business following violent protests which erupted in the city after the death of teenager Michael Brown who was shot and killed by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson about a month ago on Sept. 10, 2014 in Ferguson, Mo. Although the violence has subsided and businesses have reopened, residents continue to protest for a change in the city leadership and against racial profiling by the police. 
  • Sarah Thomas, left, and Quinisha Huntley, students at University of Alabama, visit a make-shift memorial for Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., Oct. 4, 2014. The St. Louis suburb has become a place of anger, despair and resentment since the death of Michael Brown, and many here are unsure if it will recover. 
  • Protesters exchange words with a Ferguson police officer who was moving them off the street in front of the Ferguson Police Department, as they called for the resignation of Chief Tom Jackson on Sept. 25, 2014.
  • St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar, left, and Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson gather Sept. 27, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. Authorities say a police officer was shot in Ferguson Saturday, the city that has been the scene of unrest since the Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed, black 18-year-old, by a white police officer.
  • A Ferguson protester argues with others who came to object to a proposed development in their subdivision during a meeting of the St. Louis County Council on Sept. 16, 2014.
  • A police officer stands at Chambers Road at West Florissant on Sept. 27, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. Authorities say a police officer was shot in Ferguson Saturday, the city that has been the scene of unrest since the Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed, black 18-year-old, by a white police officer.
  • Activists raise their hands in solidarity as a policeman tries to block others, who were demanding justice for the shooting death of teen Michael Brown, from advancing onto the steps to the Thomas F. Eagleton United States Courthouse in downtown St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 26, 2014. The slaying of the 18-year-old black youth Michael Brown by a white police officer, Darren Wilson, in the St Louis suburb of Ferguson on Aug. 9 led to days of unrest and drew global attention to race relations in the United States. 
  • A police officer stands guard along Interstate Highway 70 to prevent demonstrators from entering the highway on Sept. 10, 2014 near Ferguson, Mo. The demonstrators had planned to shut down I70 but their efforts were thwarted by a large contingent of police from several area departments. Ferguson, in suburban St. Louis, is recovering from nearly two weeks of violent protests that erupted after teenager Michael Brown was shot and killed by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson last month. 

of

Updated

Protesters and activists will once again descend on Ferguson, Missouri this weekend in an organized show of support for Michael Brown, the unarmed black teen who was shot and killed by officer Darren Wilson on Aug. 9. Groups including Hands Up United, Organization for Black Struggle, Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment are planning a “weekend of resistance” starting on Oct. 10.

Brown’s death in August immediately sparked weeks of violent protests and put the city under siege. Now, nearly two months after the shooting, tensions remain high in the St. Louis area. In one recent incident at a St. Louis Cardinals baseball game, supporters of Wilson were confronted by Brown supporters, resulting in a shouting match of hurled insults. Protesters also interrupted a St. Louis Symphony performance by singing and unfurling banners. 

This weekend’s events will differ from past demonstrations in that protesters will not be forced by police to keep moving and stay off sidewalks. A federal judge ruled earlier this week that the “five-second rule,” a crowd-dispersal tactic used by police that barred people from standing in one place, violated peaceful protesters’ rights to free speech and due process. 

Missouri law enforcement have begun preparing for this weekend’s event, as well as the possibility that the grand jury investigating the incident might not indict Wilson, who has remained in hiding since the shooting. Many fear that violent riots could resume if Wilson is not indicted. Area police are regularly meeting and coordinating with the FBI should another outbreak of violence occur, according to Reuters.

Speak Out