Ebola claims another life in the US

  • Health workers in protective suits transport Dr. Martin Salia, a surgeon working in Sierra Leone who had been diagnosed with Ebola, from a jet that brought him from Sierra Leone to a waiting ambulance that will take him to the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Nov. 15, 2014. Dr. Salia is the third Ebola patient at the Omaha hospital and the 10th person with Ebola to be treated in the U.S.
  • Dr. Martin Salia is placed on a stretcher upon his arrival at the Nebraska Medical Center Biocontainment Unit in Omaha, Nebraska, Nov. 15, 2014. The Sierra Leonean surgeon who is critically ill with Ebola was flown to the United States from West Africa on Saturday and was transported to a Nebraska Medical Center for treatment, hospital officials said. Salia, 44, a permanent U.S. resident, caught Ebola working as a surgeon in a Freetown hospital, according to his family.
  • Police officers stand outside the home of Craig Spencer, a Doctors Without Borders physician who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa, Oct. 23, 2014, in New York. Spencer tested positive for the virus, according to preliminary test results, city officials said.
  • New media gather at the entrance to Bellevue Hospital on Oct. 23, 2014 after a doctor who recently returned to New York from West Africa was rushed with a fever to be tested for possible Ebola, the city’s health department said.
  • Barbara Smith, a registered nurse with Mount Sinai Medical Health Systems, St. Luke’s and Roosevelt Hospitals in New York, demonstrates putting on personal protective equipment (PPE) during an Ebola educational session for healthcare workers at the Jacob Javits Convention center in New York on Oct. 21, 2014
  • An ambulance carrying Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital nurse Nina Pham drives away from the Frederick Municipal Airport on Oct. 16, 2014 in Frederick, Md. Pham contracted Ebola when she was part of a team of healthcare workers who had treated Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian who was the first patient diagnosed with the virus in the United States and who died October 8. National Institutes of Health Director Dr. Anthony Fauci told members of Congress that Pham, 26, is being transferred from Dallas to an isolation unit at the NIH in Bethesda, Maryland.
  • Emergency personnel put on protective clothing as they prepare to enter a residential apartment after a second health-care worker tested positive for the Ebola virus in Dallas, Oct. 16, 2014. The latest Texas health worker infected with Ebola is Amber Vinson, a 29-year-old nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, one of her relatives said on Wednesday.
  • Emergency personnel wearing protective clothing prepare to enter a residential apartment after a second health care worker tested positive for the Ebola virus in Dallas, Oct. 16, 2014.
  • Police keep watch on a home, Oct. 16, 2014 in Tallmadge, Ohio where Amber Joy Vinson stayed over the weekend before flying home to Dallas. At least seven people in northeast Ohio are under voluntary quarantine and being monitored because they had contact with Vinson, a Texas nurse who was diagnosed with Ebola shortly after visiting the area last weekend, health officials said Thursday.
  • An ambulance driver wearing a protective suit escorts Amber Joy Vinson (not shown), the second health worker to be infected with the Ebola virus at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital to the airport in Dallas, Texas, Oct. 15, 2014. Vinson was transferred to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta.
  • Texas nurse Amber Vinson (L) exits an ambulance at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, Oct. 15, 2014. Vinson, the second Texas nurse who had contracted Ebola was flown to Emory Wednesday after being transferred from Texas Presbyterian Hospital. She had treated Liberian patient Thomas Eric Duncan, who died of Ebola and was the first patient diagnosed with the virus in the United States.
  • An ambulance transporting Amber Joy Vinson, a U.S. nurse who has Ebola, arrives with a security detail at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, Oct. 15, 2014. Vinson, the second Texas nurse who had contracted Ebola, was sent to Emory on Wednesday after being transferred from Texas Presbyterian Hospital. She had treated Liberian patient Thomas Eric Duncan, who died of Ebola and was the first patient diagnosed with the virus in the United States.
  • Tallmadge police cordon off a home in Tallmadge, Ohio, Oct. 15, 2014, where Amber Joy Vinson stayed over the weekend before flying home to Dallas. Vinson, a nurse who helped care for Thomas Eric Duncan, has also been diagnosed with the Ebola virus.
  • The Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, where health care worker Nina Pham is being treated for the Ebola virus, is seen on Oct. 14, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. Pham contracted the virus when she provided treatment to Thomas Eric Duncan, the West African man who later died from the disease.
  • A hazmat worker prepares to put on protective gear outside of an apartment where Amber Vinson, the second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on Oct. 13, 2014 in Dallas, Texas.
  • Hazmat workers walk down a drive towards the back of an apartment where Amber Vinson, the second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on Oct. 13, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. Officials say Vinson, who cared for Liberian patient Thomas Eric Duncan has tested positive for the virus.
  • A man wearing a hazardous material suit prepares to remove a pet dog named Bentley from the home of a nurse, Nina Pham, infected with Ebola, in this handout picture released by the City of Dallas, Texas, Oct. 13, 2014. “Bentley is safe,” Dallas spokeswoman Sana Syed said on her Twitter feed of the pet who has been under the spotlight after officials in Madrid put down the dog of a Spanish nurse who contacted Ebola while caring for a patient.
  • A member of the CG Environmental HazMat team disinfects the entrance to the residence of a health worker identified as Nina Pham, at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital who has contracted Ebola in Dallas, Texas, Oct. 12, 2014. The infected worker, Nina Pham, is believed to be the first person to contract the disease in the United States.
  • A man collects and bags items behind the ambulance used to transport a patient  with possible Ebola symptoms to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Mass., Oct. 12, 2014. The patient had recently returned from Liberia and was displaying symptoms of Ebola was transferred from a medical clinic to a Boston hospital on Sunday, the hospital said. The patient has not been confirmed to have the deadly virus.

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The latest U.S.-based doctor who became infected with the Ebola virus while treating patients in Sierra Leone has died, a medical director confirmed on Nov. 17. He was the third patient treated for Ebola at the Nebraska Medical Center’s biocontainment unit and the 10th patient with Ebola to be treated on American soil.

“We weren’t able to get him through this,” the University of Nebraska’s Division Chief Dr. Daniel Johnson said at a press conference. “We really, really gave it everything we could.”

Hospital officials reported that “every advanced technique” was used to try and save Salia’s life, but they were unsuccessful. The hospital tried several Ebola treatments in the 36 hours where they were treating the doctor, using an unapproved but anecdotally successful drug, Zmapp, and a plasma donation from an unknown Ebola survivor.

The previous U.S. patient diagnosed with Ebola, Dr. Craig Spencer, was declared free of the virus on Nov. 11. He had been working with Doctors Without Borders to treat those infected with the disease in Guinea, a West African country particularly hard hit by the epidemic. Spencer was diagnosed with Ebola after returning to New York City.

The family of Thomas Eric Duncan, the first Ebola case diagnosed on American soil, alleges that he wasn’t well cared for after being initially misdiagnosed and sent home, and that he didn’t receive the most advanced treatment available. They settled out of court against the hospital.

Nurses Amber Vinson and Nina Pham, both of whom tested positive for Ebola after treating Duncan, successfully recovered from their infections and were deemed virus-free. 

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