Must Read Op-Eds for May 3, 2011

Updated

Here are the opinion columns and editorials for today.

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES AMBASSADOR YOUSEF AL OTAIBA ON BIN LADEN
MAY 2, 2011

“The world is a safer place without Osama bin Laden.  This forceful blow against extremism and terrorism is a significant step for all of those committed to peace and tolerance. … We applaud the men and women of the intelligence community and military for their relentless commitment and substantial sacrifice.”

THE LONG-AWAITED NEWS
Editorial
New York Times

Bin Laden’s death is an extraordinary moment for Americans and all who have lost loved ones in horrifying, pointless acts of terrorism. As fresh as those wounds still are, though, we were struck by how irrelevant Bin Laden has become in the streets of Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Bahrain and Syria, where people are struggling for freedom.

4 QUESTIONS HE LEAVES BEHIND
By Joe Nocera
New York Times

The clock can’t be turned back just because he’s dead. The distrust remains strong. A friend who recently returned from Turkey — a Muslim country that is ostensibly a close ally — told me that the Turkish media were united in their virulent opposition to NATO’s actions in Libya, even though those actions were intended to prevent a cruel dictator from killing his own people. “The image of Westerners dropping bombs on Muslims is very hard for Muslims to accept,” he said. One hopes that this is not Bin Laden’s enduring legacy. But that’s something only we can fix. 

 

WHAT DRIVES HISTORY
By David Brooks
New York Times

Osama Bin Laden seemed to live in an ethereal, postmodern world of symbols and signifiers and also a cruel murderous world of rage and humiliation. Even the most brilliant intelligence analyst could not anticipate such an odd premodern and postglobalized creature, or could imagine that such a creature would gain such power. 


WITH BIN LADEN’S DEATH, A MOMENT OF LIBERATION
By Eugene Robinson
Washington Post

As long as bin Laden remained at large and unaccountable, he retained the power he had so cruelly usurped on Sept. 11. On Sunday, those who gathered at the White House were celebrating our psychological liberation. The changes in our lives will endure, but the man responsible for those changes is gone at last. 

HOW THE U.S. FOUND AND FINISHED BIN LADEN
By David Ignatius
Washington Post

Does bin Laden’s demise mean the death of al-Qaeda? CIA analysts won’t go that far. But … The hidden trophy of Sunday’s raid: The JSOC team captured intelligence materials from the compound that might reveal the location of Ayman al-Zawahiri, the organization’s new commander. “That’s where we’re going next,” says one U.S. official involved in planning the operation. 

PAKISTAN DID ITS PART
By Asif Ali Zardari

Washington Post

He was not anywhere we had anticipated he would be, but now he is gone. Although the events of Sunday were not a joint operation, a decade of cooperation and partnership between the United States and Pakistan led up to the elimination of Osama bin Laden as a continuing threat to the civilized world. 

BIN LADEN’S LAST CHALLENGE – TO REPUBLICANS
By William McGurn
Wall Street Journal

If Republicans are smart they will recognize that this meme took a big hit when a Navy Seal put a bullet in bin Laden’s head. Along with his decision to ramp up the war in Afghanistan and Pakistan, the president now has the opportunity to present himself in a way few Democrats ever have: as more hard-nosed about protecting the American people from foreign threats than his Republican opponents.

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Must Read Op-Eds for May 3, 2011

Updated