Joe Scarborough: Assad thinks Obama is weak

Updated
Syria's President Bashar al-Assad (C) meets Alaeddin Boroujerdi (L), head of the Iranian parliamentary committee for national security and foreign policy, in...
Syria's President Bashar al-Assad (C) meets Alaeddin Boroujerdi (L), head of the Iranian parliamentary committee for national security and foreign policy, in...
Handout/SANA/Reuters

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad thinks President Obama is weak and doesn’t want to become involved with international affairs, Joe Scarborough said Wednesday on Morning Joe.

“Assad is doing what Assad is doing because…he thinks he can get away with anything he wants to get away with,” the show’s co-host said.

President Obama, who didn’t immediately seek approval from Congress to strike Syria, made his international case for intervening in Syria during a press conference in Sweden Wednesday morning. He said the world’s credibility is on the line if it doesn’t hold Assad responsible for allegedly killing civilians in a chemical attack last month.

“I think Barack Obama, after saying Assad must go and after drawing the red lines in the sand, I think he sends a really, really bad message not only to the Syrians—who really can’t do us damage in the long run—but to the Iranians, their client state, who really can do us big trouble,” Scarborough said.

Many American lawmakers insist the president continues to consult with Congress as he considers military intervention.

The Obama administration has said its intelligence shows Assad last month used chemical weapons to kill at least 1,420 people, including more than 400 children. The president called on Congress during the Labor Day weekend to authorize a limited strike on Syria.

Most Americans—59%—are opposed to the missile strikes, whereas 36% said they supported action, according to a new ABC News/Washington Post poll.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee drafted a new bipartisan resolution Tuesday night for a limited strike. The resolution comes with a 60-day time frame and prohibits the use of ground forces. The House of Representatives is pushing for a similar plan.

There has been a “significant” amount of planning at the White House for possible repercussions against the United States, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Menendez said Wednesday on the show.

The Senate panel could vote on the draft as early as Wednesday. The full Senate will then vote on the decision after Sept. 9.

(Watch more on Morning Joe):

Joe Scarborough: Assad thinks Obama is weak

Updated