Biden: ‘I can die a happy man never having been president…but it doesn’t mean I won’t run’

Updated
Vice President Joe Biden gestures  as he speaks about reducing domestic violence, Wednesday, March 13, 2013, at the Montgomery County Executive Office...
Vice President Joe Biden gestures as he speaks about reducing domestic violence, Wednesday, March 13, 2013, at the Montgomery County Executive Office...
Charles Dharapak/AP Photo

Vice President Joe Biden has two portraits in his office: Thomas Jefferson and John Adams—two historic vice presidents who went on to become president.

Will Biden follow in their footsteps? Maybe, maybe not.

“I can die a happy man never having been president of the United States of America,” the vice president told GQ. “But it doesn’t mean I won’t run.”

As Biden’s popularity has risen in the last year, so has his and his staffers interest in the higher office, the magazine’s feature on Biden notes.

But then, abruptly, Biden’s stock started steeply rising, at least in the eyes of the public. Washington had been hyperventilating about the fiscal cliff, and Obama sent Biden in to broker a deal. Then came the killings in Newtown, Connecticut, and Obama sent Biden out to rally the public, Biden in to reason with Congress, Biden over to talk to the NRA. In 2013, Biden has emerged increasingly more visibly potent than his boss. THE MOST INFLUENTIAL VICE PRESIDENT IN HISTORY? one headline proffered.

“Well, he would be crazy not to keep his options open,” staffers started saying then, whenever the 2016 issue came up.

GQ’s Michael Hainey joined the Morning Joe panel to discuss the story and perhaps the biggest question in any 2016 conversation: Will Hillary run?

“It’s his to lose if Hillary doesn’t run,” Hainey predicted.

Watch the full discussion below.

Biden: ‘I can die a happy man never having been president…but it doesn't mean I won’t run’

Updated