MHP’s homework invites you to dig deeper

Updated
MHP's homework invites you to dig deeper
MHP's homework invites you to dig deeper
UNC Press

It is always hard to find enough time to do justice to all the many facets of the topics we spotlight in a particular show. And that, of course, is why there is always #nerdland homework!

Here are some things that you can read to learn more the issues we presented today.

You’ll want to start with “MHP” show guest Scott Farris’ “Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation.” It’s a fascinating look at the ways that presidential losers have actually helped shape the American project.

I also mentioned Blair L.M. Kelley’s “Right to Ride: Streetcar Boycotts and African American Citizenship.” Her history of the so-called “age of accommodation” reminds us that what might look like accommodation is actually “thwarted resistance”: people who fought for freedom, and lost; and fought again, and lost; until ultimately, they won.

If you are a radio listener, like me, then we know you enjoyed our segment on local radio and the continuing role of radio in political news coverage. Here is a fun book on radio if you like the topic: “Hello Everybody: The Dawn of American Radio,” by Anthony Rudel.

Today we discussed the Violence Against Women Act and the multiple, difficult, legal, political and social issues associated with the domestic violence. You must read the  foundational legal article that links domestic violence with issue of race, class, immigrant status, economic vulnerability and all the many issues the new VAWA tries to address. It is Kimberle Crenshaw’s “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity and Violence Against Women of Color.” You can click and read the whole article here.

To learn more about the history of the NAACP and its decades of work to bring racial justice to America – sometimes using the international strategies we discussed on the show today – check out Patricia Sullivan’s definitive history of the organization, “Lift Every Voice: The NAACP and the Making of the Civil Rights Movement.”

And of course, take the time to learn more about Project Unbreakable by reading the interview with Grace Brown right here on our blog.

See you on Sunday morning!

MHP's homework invites you to dig deeper

Updated