Top Links: The consensus on immigration is that everyone has a different definition of ‘consensus’

Updated
Immigration reformists are "encouraged" by the House's inability to tie its own shoelaces on the matter.
Immigration reformists are "encouraged" by the House's inability to tie its own shoelaces on the matter.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Top story: You can’t throw a rock and not hit “consensus” when it comes to immigration reform. Unfortunately, most of that consensus you want to throw a rock at.

  • Speaker Boehner today seems genuinely to want to do something about immigration reform. (The Plum Line)
  • Boehner: “The vast majority of our members do believe we have to wrestle with this problem.” (Elise Foley)
  • That’s where “consensus” gets tricky. Because House Republicans appear to be in consensus that the administration “cannot be trusted to deliver on its promises to secure the border and enforce laws as part of a single, massive bill like the one passed by the Senate.” (Texas on the Potomac)
  • There also appears to be a consensus on the Far Right that any bill that goes to and comes back from a Senate-House conference committee — without towing the Club for Growth/Heritage line — is going to contain some bad juju for Republicans. (David Drucker), (Robert Costa) and (Luke Russert)
  • Which is similar to something we discussed on Wednesday. (msnbc)
  • As a result, House and Senate Democratic leaders have reached their own consensus about Speaker John Boehner: They feel sorry for him. (Chad Pergram) and (HuffPost Politics)
  • A consensus also appears to be forming on the part of pro-reformist Democrats and Republicans: Use the word “encouraged” to mean “worried” when discussing the House and immigration reform. (Mark Knoller)(The Hill) and (Chuck Schumer)
  • As PlumLine’s Greg Sargent also points out, there is a growing consensus — call it “fear” — that Republicans would accept a “path to citizenship” under no circumstances. (The Plum Line)
  • And then you have congressmen in ultra-white Clorox bleach districts who have their own peculiar brand of consensus. (BuzzFeed Politics)
  • The genuine consensus, however, is that immigration reform — if it happens — will be in the Fall. And that’s if it happens. (Politico) and (The Washington Examiner)
  • CNBC/NYT’s John Harwood: “Senior GOP House member: No resolution to immigration issue until after debt ceiling settled.” (John Harwood)

Top Links: The consensus on immigration is that everyone has a different definition of 'consensus'

Updated