Top Links: Breaking the Norquist pledge, confidential confetti and McCain’s new, softer criticism of Rice

Updated
President Mohammed Morsi new edicts have sparked angry protests across the country to demand the decrees be immediately rescinded.
President Mohammed Morsi new edicts have sparked angry protests across the country to demand the decrees be immediately rescinded.
AP Photo/Ahmed Gomaa

Welcome to Cyber Monday, or “Monday” as anyone under the age of 40 would call it. Here are some of the stories we’ll be following at 4 p.m.

    • Polls: If we go over the fiscal cliff, Republicans will get the blame. (CNN)
    • The good news is that Republicans are ready to break their pledge to Grover Norquist over taxes. (NBC News)
    • Well, sort of: “It is not hard for a GOP senator to *say* he’s not beholden to Norquist. What matters is what GOPers actually support.” (Greg Sargent)
    • In fact, in the real behind-the-scenes negotiations, “Neither side gave ground in an opening round of staff-level talks last week at the Capitol.” (Washington Post)

  • “Let’s forget about the rich and ultrarich going on strike and stuffing their ample funds under their mattresses if— gasp—capital gains rates and ordinary income rates are increased. The ultrarich, including me, will forever pursue investment opportunities.” – Warren Buffet, on the need for a minimum tax on high incomes. (The New York Times)
  • John McCain is walking back some of the stronger criticism he’s levied against Amb. Susan Rice over the Benghazi attacks. Facts can do that to a person. (National Journal)
  • The intersection of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi’s power grab and “Calvin and Hobbes.” (Marc Lynch)
  • New York City parade-goers found confidential information—including social security numbers and then-candidate Mitt Romney’s travel details—used as confetti during Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade. (WPIX)
  • As of now, President Obama had a bigger margin of victory than either of George W. Bush’s elections. (David Leonhardt)
  • And, please, the “cyber” in “Cyber Monday” belongs to a period of time that included AOL dialup accounts and Alta Vista search engines. (Ben White) and more (Ben White)

Top Links: Breaking the Norquist pledge, confidential confetti and McCain’s new, softer criticism of Rice

Updated