Moving like Jagger against the fiscal cliff

Updated
By Todd Goodman
Stephen Crowley/New York Times
Stephen Crowley/New York Times

If the Rolling Stones can do it, why not Congress?

50 years after they first turned the world of music upside down with an anti-Beatles persona and the kind of music that left both kids and their parents screaming (for very different reasons), the Stones have put their legendary differences aside and re-united for their fans and one last shot at rock & roll glory.

Back in Washington, President Obama still can’t get no satisfaction from Republicans in congress—even after winning re-election by a wide margin. Despite House Speaker John Boehner emerging from a meeting at the White House ten days ago to say the GOP is willing to put revenue (read: taxes) on the table, Republicans now seem to be back tracking into the “loopholes and deductions” language that worked so well for Mitt Romney.

It appears that this bunch missed the message delivered so forcefully by voters on election night. In fact, a new poll reveals a full two-thirds of Americans expect congress to behave like “spoiled children” when they return to work on Tuesday for a lame duck session.

Here is where Congress could learn from the Rolling Stones. In the course of 50 years of making music, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards have suffered through a love-hate relationshiop for the ages, complete with public airings of dirty laundry, insults and threats of divorce. But when the chips are down, they repeatedly bury the hatchet and do what’s right for the throngs of fans who paved the golden road they travel.

For those who think of themselves as the rock stars of Washington—who live in the swanky Georgetown townhouses so graciously provided them by voters who actually show up for work day in and day out—it’s time to take a page from the Glimmer Twins.  The fight is over. The people have spoken. So bury the hatchet, pop the gold cuff links, roll up your sleeves and take the stage.

At this point, American’s simply ain’t too proud to beg and the crowd awaits with great anticipation. We may not get what we want, but will we get what we need?

Moving like Jagger against the fiscal cliff

Updated