Boston tragedy: Heroes and helpers

Updated
By Bethany E. Frank
This undated photo provided by Bill Richard shows his son, Martin Richard, in Boston. Martin Richard, 8, was among the at least three people killed in the...
This undated photo provided by Bill Richard shows his son, Martin Richard, in Boston. Martin Richard, 8, was among the at least three people killed in the...
Bill Richard/AP Photo

The explosions that rocked Monday’s annual Boston Marathon reverberated in many hearts. One of the victims was eight-year-old Martin Richard. A widely-circulated picture of him holding a sign that says “No more hurting people” underlined the tragic loss of a young child and his innocent hopefulness.

In the face of terror, people all over the Boston area became heroes. Civilians as well as policemen, firefighters and rescue workers ran into harm’s way to help others in danger. Reports that some runners continued after crossing the finish line to donate blood at a local hospital spread on Twitter. People opened their homes to those who were stranded, offered help to strangers and were willing to donate so much blood that the Red Cross had enough to meet demand. Google set up a person finder to help loved ones track marathon runners and potential victims, and a Google Doc was organized by Boston.com to compile addresses where stranded people could find shelter.

Technology Underwriting Greater Good, a start-up social entrepreneurship company based in Boston, set up a site to donate 100% of funds raised to the Red Cross and Boston Children’s Hospital. NBC News Correspondent Ann Curry revived her acts of kindness campaign after support for the cause came from followers across the country. You can get involved by visiting the TUGG effort’s website, following and posting using #26Acts2 on Twitter.

Boston tragedy: Heroes and helpers

Updated