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E.g., 10/24/2014
E.g., 10/24/2014
CDC already in place for NYC Ebola diagnosis

CDC already in place for NYC Ebola diagnosis

10/23/14 11:40PM

Chris Jansing, senior White House correspondent for NBC News, talks with Rachel Maddow about the scope and resources of the federal government's role within New York City's Ebola response infrastructure on Ebola czar Ron Klain's second day on the job. watch

Dallas to NYC: 'You're going to be OK'

Dallas official to NYC: 'You're going to be OK'

10/23/14 11:30PM

Clay Jenkins, Dallas County Judge, talks with Rachel Maddow about New York's first case of Ebola and offers advice to health responders as well as New Yorkers who may be concerned about the risks of further transmission in the city. watch

Extensive preparation seen in Ebola response

Extensive preparation seen in Ebola response

10/23/14 11:00PM

Dr. Irwin Redlener of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness, talks with Rachel Maddow from in front of Bellevue Hospital about why Bellevue is among hospitals specially designated for Ebola cases and describes some of the protocols being followed. watch

Ebola risks specific to body fluids

Ebola risks specific to body fluids

10/23/14 09:16PM

Dr. Amesh Adalja of the Infectious Disease Society, talks with Rachel Maddow about the nature of Ebola, how it presents and how it spreads and how New York City's experience with infectious diseases has prepared it to deal with this new patient. watch

NYC Ebola case met with prepared response

NYC Ebola case met with prepared response

10/23/14 09:07PM

Dr. Stephen Morse, professor of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, talks with Rachel Maddow about the extent to which New York City is prepared to handle an Ebola case and what protocols are being followed. watch

Ahead on the 10/23/14 Maddow show

10/23/14 08:31PM

Tonight's guests:

  • Dr. Stephen Morse, professor of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University
  • Dr. Stephen Morse, professor of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University
  • Dr. Amesh Adalja, Infectious Disease Society
  • Katy Tur, NBC News correspondent
  • Dr. Kathryn Jacobsen, George Mason University

After the jump, executive producer Cory Gnazzo has a look at what everyone's working on...

ADDING: After we shot Cory's video there was a lot of breaking news, not the least of which is the positive test for Ebola in New York City, so the video is not quite up to date, but that's all the more reason to tune in!

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Thursday's Mini-Report, 10.23.14

10/23/14 05:30PM

Today's edition of quick hits:
 
* Ottawa: "The gunman who terrorized Ottawa with a deadly ambush on a military guard and a shooting inside Parliament acted alone, the Canadian police said on Thursday, but there were new indications that he had hinted of his intentions and may have had collaborators."
 
* Kevin Vickers: "In Canada, they call the job of sergeant-at-arms 'ceremonial.' But as the Calgary Sun said this morning, anyone who thought it was an 'archaic novelty now understands the man holding the sceptre has a deadly serious job.'"
 
* ISIS: "Dizzy, vomiting and struggling to breathe, 11 Iraqi police officers were rushed to a government hospital 50 miles north of the capital last month. The diagnosis: poisoning by chlorine gas. The perpetrators, according to the officers: Islamic State extremists."
 
* More ISIS: "The American military campaign against the Islamic State has begun to cut into the Sunni militant group's substantial oil revenues, the top counterterrorism official at the Treasury Department said on Thursday, but starving its cash flow will be a slow process."
 
* Nigeria: The Islamist militant movement Boko Haram has once again kidnapped dozens of girls and young women in northeast Nigeria, U.S. counterterrorism officials told NBC News on Thursday. To great skepticism, the Nigerian government announced a truce last week with Boko Haram.... [O]fficials said the abduction Saturday of as many as 60 more girls and young women was believed to have been a direct response to the government's announcement."
 
* Kim Jong-un is puzzling everyone again: "A series of gestures by the North Korean leader, most dramatically the release this week of an imprisoned American tourist, Jeffrey E. Fowle, has raised hopes that after two and a half years of bellicose rhetoric, punctuated by periodic missile tests, Mr. Kim is groping for some kind of rapprochement with the United States and its allies."
 
* Good for him: "Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen will contribute 'at least' $100 million to fight the spread of Ebola, he announced Thursday. In a tweet, Allen revealed the new donation amount and urged others to make their own contributions -- big or small."
 
* South Carolina: "Bobby Harrell, speaker of the S.C. House since 2005, pleaded guilty to six counts of use of campaign funds for personal expenses on Thursday morning and has agreed to resign immediately from his House seat. In a plea hearing at the Richland County courthouse, Harrell was given six one-year prison sentences but all were suspended by circuit court Judge Casey Manning after Harrell, 58, agreed to the following conditions in a written plea agreement:"
 
* More on this on tonight's show: "Early voting starts Thursday in North Carolina, even as the state has pushed to move early voting sites farther away from college campuses."
 
* Welcome candor from Labor Secretary Tom Perez: "The U.S. federal wage floor ranks third-lowest -- as a percentage of median wage -- among the 34 member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a status that Perez said was embarrassing. 'I mean, we suck,' Perez said. 'We really do.'"

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