The Company Memo: Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Updated
George Zimmerman, left,  stands in the courtroom with defense counsel Mark O'Mara during closing arguments in his trial at the Seminole County Criminal...
George Zimmerman, left, stands in the courtroom with defense counsel Mark O'Mara during closing arguments in his trial at the Seminole County Criminal...
Joe Burbank

A member of the jury on the George Zimmerman trial has come forward to discuss why Zimmerman was acquitted. The juror told CNN’s Anderson Cooper that after the first vote, the jury was split down the middle, with half favoring a conviction and the other three favoring acquittal. She also said that she didn’t believe race was a factor. Our panel will discuss what the juror said and the circumstances that prompted the verdict. Later, Congresswoman Robin Kelly, D-Ill., will join Jansisng & Co. to discuss the likelihood of the federal government filing civil rights charges against Zimmerman.

Senate Democrats have been threatening to invoke the nuclear option and reform the filibuster for months, and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid insists he is ready to carry out that threat any day now. Senator Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., will tell Jansing and Co. how close his colleagues really are to going nuclear on the filibuster.

Headlining Tuesday’s NAACP Convention in Orlando, Florida is the Zimmerman verdict. We’ll have the latest from the convention and the response from civil rights leaders.

Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law was one of the key issues surrounding the Zimmerman trial, and similar laws in other states have come under scrutiny as well. A man in Texas was acquitted for killing an escort thanks to a statute permitting citizens to use deadly force under certain conditions. We’ll have the latest on the movements against these laws.

Opponents of the recently passed Texas bill restricting abortion haven’t given up and are taking their fight to the courts. We’ll discuss how far this newly gained momentum from passing the law can take the anti-abortion movement.

And activists are raising awareness about a startling crime called “pet-flipping”. Beloved pets are stolen and then offered back to unsuspecting pet owners offering rewards.

The Company Memo: Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Updated