The Company Memo: Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Updated
By msnbc staff
President Barack Obama gestures as he speaks to workers about the economy during a visit to Daimler Detroit Diesel in Redford, Mich., Monday, Dec. 10, 2012.
President Barack Obama gestures as he speaks to workers about the economy during a visit to Daimler Detroit Diesel in Redford, Mich., Monday, Dec. 10, 2012.
AP Photo/Paul Sancya

Good morning! Here’s what’s on today’s agenda:

“Obama takes push for higher taxes on wealthy to workers at Michigan plant” by Philip Rucker and Lori Montgomery, The Washington Post

“President Obama hit the campaign trail again on Monday — more than a month after the election — firing up a crowd of blue-collar automotive workers with calls to raise taxes on the wealthy and eagerly wading into a local political dispute over the powers of labor unions.”


Tune in at 10:00 AM ET to hear from DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz, The AP’s Liz Sidoti and Reason magazine’s editor inc chief Matt Welch. 

“After Hillary Clinton, who will fight for women?” by Ritu Sharma, POLITICO

“Amid all the speculation over what Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will or will not do next, here’s the question that’s not being asked: Will anyone else bring the same dedication and focus to improving the lives of women around the world as she has done?”


We’ll talk with human rights activist and writer Kerry Kennedy.  

“In Talks, House Majority Weighs Loyalty to Voters” by Jonathan Weisman, The New York Times

“”As their leaders inch toward agreeing to higher tax rates, dozens of House Republicans find themselves caught between the will of a larger American public that favors higher taxes on the rich and the wishes of constituents who re-elected them overwhelmingly to oppose the Obama agenda at every turn.”


Former Governor Ted Strickland (D-Ohio)  and former campaign manager for Gov. Mike Huckabee’s 2008 campaign, Chip Saltsman,  join us. 

“Profiting From a Child’s Illiteracy” by Nicholas D. Kristof, The New York Times

“This is painful for a liberal to admit, but conservatives have a point when they suggest that America’s safety net can sometimes entangle people in a soul-crushing dependency. Our poverty programs do rescue many people, but other times they backfire.”


The New York Times’ Nick Kristof is here to discuss his column. 

The Company Memo: Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Updated