From pageants to politics

Updated
before the Miss USA pageant, Sunday, June 19, 2011, in Las Vegas.
before the Miss USA pageant, Sunday, June 19, 2011, in Las Vegas.
AP Photo/Julie Jacobson

Honey Boo Boo for president?

Not quite. But a new article in Marie Claire says more and more beauty queens are turning their sights to politics.

“The route to becoming a pageant queen is very similar to becoming a local politician,” Lea Goldman, features editor at Marie Claire said on Jansing & Co.

“There’s a lot of glad-handing, a lot of local events. There’s a lot of schmoozing and networking. So really it’s a great way to hone those skills,” Goldman told msnbc’s Chris Jansing.

Reality shows like “Here Comes Honey Boo Boo” and “Toddlers & Tiaras” have helped renew the popularity of pageants in recent years. But the growing political aspirations of some contestants is challenging the stereotype that beauty queens only want to pursue careers in acting and modeling.

A few of this year’s Miss America contestants have already tested the political waters. Anna Laura Bryan (Miss Alabama 2012) has authored legislation allowing autistic children to bring service dogs to school. And Allyn Rose (Miss Maryland 2012) envisions a future run for governor.

“Historically, that kind of ambition would cue an eye roll. It would be the equivalent of saying ‘I’d like to cure world hunger.’ But really it’s hard not to take these women seriously. They take themselves very seriously,” Goldman said.

From pageants to politics

Updated