A word about the yahoos

Updated
I think the Republican Party is making a happy home for these folks. Sen. David Vitter, R-La., is the most recent to swing wide the gate. He was asked where he stands on whether President Obama should be sued for not being an American, and he said that such a suit would be “valid and possibly effective.” Question: Why would a United States Senator support a court case arguing that the President isn’t one of us, isn’t an American? Why would he say for all to hear that bringing such a case in U.S. courts could be an “effective” way of exposing the President of the United States as an undocumented alien, who not only doesn’t have the right to be in the White House, but also, on the same legal basis, doesn’t have the right to be among us in the United States? Why would he say that the president needs to be deported to some country where he, according to this brand of thinking, was born? So, Vitter backs “Birthers.” Well, that’s bad enough… But there are a dozen other Republican members of Congress who’ve backed the Birther movement. This no-nothing-ism is catchy. During the last presidential campaign, a trio of Republican candidates – Tancredo (No surprise there!), Huckabee (Join the club!), and Sam Brownback – all said that they didn’t believe in evolution. The beat goes on. No matter how much information is accumulated on climate change, it’s okay in the Republican Party to simply deny it, this despite the fact that the Nixon Library just released a memorandum from Daniel Patrick Moynihan in 1969 warning of the impact of climate change. Four decades of science is simply rejected. Not a single Republican Senator is now ready to take action on climate change. Sarah Palin likes to talk about being a “common sense conservative.” Where’s the common sense in all this refusing to use your brain?

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A word about the yahoos

Updated