Let Me Start: Divided we stand

Updated
President Obama delivers remarks at the Organizing for Action dinner in Washington on March 13, 2013
President Obama delivers remarks at the Organizing for Action dinner in Washington on March 13, 2013
Yuri Gripas/Reuters

Deep Divisions: The New York Times reports this morning that President Obama’s meeting with House Republicans at the Capitol yesterday only served to reinforce the existing divisions between the two sides. Republicans are digging in – doubling down on budget ideas that have been rejected year after year. And the president says balancing the budget in the next ten years isn’t a high priority – Democrats want higher taxes on the wealthy and on corporations combined with new spending to help put people back to work. Politico’s take on the meeting is that Republicans found out that President Obama says the same thing in public and on TV as he does behind closed doors.

And here’s a telling poll number: Americans have more dissatisfaction in government than at any time since Watergate.

Politico introduces us to the man behind President Obama’s charm offensive: New White House chief of staff Denis McDonough.

President Obama also met with his political supporters last night when he addressed his former campaign staffers and apparatus who are now part of the group Organizing for Action. His goal? To keep alive the agenda he pushed during his re-election campaign and keep progressives in the conversation.

The president is also urging Senate Democrats to reform the filibuster, which is being used to hold up record numbers of judicial appointments.

The Republican clown show known as CPAC is in town today. And while Sarah Palin and Donald Trump will be there, two of the party’s most promising candidates for national office won’t be. And of the ones who will be there, here’s Politico’s list of who to watch.

Finally, another Republican in Congress needs to go back and re-learn his civics lessons: Oklahoma freshman Jim Bridenstein says that the Supreme Court doesn’t have the final say over whether a law is constitutional or not.

Explore:

Hardball - Let Me Start

Let Me Start: Divided we stand

Updated