Dems trounce GOP in new popularity contest: poll

Updated
Supporters cheer at the end of President Barack Obama remarks during an election night party, early Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, in Chicago. Obama defeated...
Supporters cheer at the end of President Barack Obama remarks during an election night party, early Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, in Chicago. Obama defeated...
Matt Rourke/AP

Here’s another sign that the country is getting a slightly blue tint and that the time may be ripe for President Obama to press his advantage.

According to a new poll, Democrats are gaining an advantage over Republicans—47% of Americans surveyed by Gallup over the past year identified themselves as Democrats or leaning Democratic. Meanwhile, 42 percent called themselves Republicans or say they lean towards the GOP.

In 2010 and 2011 the parties were neck and neck.

The survey showed that Americans indentifying themselves as strictly Democratic (31%) and Republican (28%) have changed little. The movement has come largely from independents. The number of Democratic-leaning independents is getting bigger while the pool of Republican-leaning independents is getting smaller.

Gallup has been tracking party identification since 1991. During that time, the Dems have usually had an advantage. That includes 2008 when President Barack Obama had a record-high margin of 12 points, with 52% saying identifying as Democrat or leaning Democrat and 40% saying they were Republican or leaning Republican.

Dems trounce GOP in new popularity contest: poll

Updated