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United We Dream activists participate in a rally in front of the White House July 28, 2014 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty)

The battle over immigration action is only just beginning

11/18/14 01:04PM

The experience of the Affordable Care Act provides immigration reform advocates a powerful lesson. Even policies which are clearly in the national interest and work as intended can lose public support if advocates do not understand that the real battle begins the first day after the president acts. read more

People rally for comprehensive immigration reform on Nov. 7, 2014, outside the White House in Washington DC. (Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Immigration advocates ready for executive action

11/17/14 07:20PM

The Obama administration is expected to take unilateral action by allowing parents of U.S.-born children and immigrants with high technology skills to remain in the United States. Modeled after a similar executive action that protected DREAMers — young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children — from threats of deportation, Obama’s new action could shield as many as 5 million undocumented immigrants who currently live in the U.S. read more

Immigration reform protesters march during an immigration rally July 7, 2014 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty)

Mr. President, sign immigration executive action

11/13/14 09:36PM

President Obama cannot offer a plan with the false expectation that Republicans will compromise; that if he pulls back on using his executive authority, Congress will consider a permanent comprehensive immigration reform bill that includes a path to citizenship and that is acceptable to the Latino community and most voters across the U.S. read more

President Barack Obama speaks at "A Salute to the Troops: In Performance at the White House" on the South Lawn Nov. 6, 2014 in Washington, DC.

Is President Obama making the right call on immigration?

11/12/14 10:10AM

As President Obama prepares to press ahead with action on immigration, there are two sets of potential consequences hanging over his decision, one concerning policy, the other concerning politics. On the policy front, the loudest argument against executive action is by far the easiest for the White House to dismiss. read more

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