Talib Kweli: ‘I’ve experienced stop-and-frisk all over the world’

Updated
Talib Kweli performs at SXSW on March 11, 2013 in Austin, Texas.
Talib Kweli performs at SXSW on March 11, 2013 in Austin, Texas.
John Sciulli/Getty

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On Monday morning, a judge found New York City’s controversial stop-and-frisk policy unconstitutional, insisting that the city assumed a policy of “indirect racial profiling.” Later that day the city’s mayor, Michael Bloomberg, a vocal advocate of the policing practice, announced his plan to appeal the decision.
“I don’t think there is any question that one of the problems we have in our society today is that victims and perps of crime are disproportionately young, minority men, that is just a fact,” said the mayor in defense of the practice.
Rapper and New York native, Talib Kweli joined Monday’s All In to discuss his reaction: “Talking on a constitutional level, we have certain rights…By accepting stop-and-frisk as a policy, you’re telling people that because you live in a poor neighborhood it’s your fault and you deserve to be criminalized. And that’s not constitutional.”

Watch the full segment here

Talib Kweli: 'I've experienced stop-and-frisk all over the world'

Updated