All In agenda: The sale of The Washington Post and the future of journalism

Updated
By Rachel Simon
A man walks past The Washington Post building on August 5, 2013 in Washington, DC, after it was announced that Amazon.com founder and CEO Jeff Bezos had...
A man walks past The Washington Post building on August 5, 2013 in Washington, DC, after it was announced that Amazon.com founder and CEO Jeff Bezos had...
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty

Tuesday night on All In with Chris Hayes: Guest host and editor of The Washington Post’s Wonkblog, Ezra Klein, will explain what the sale of the newspaper to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos means for the Post and for the future of journalism. The surprise $250 million deal, announced Monday, will end four generations of ownership by the Graham family. Klein will talk with Michael Moynihan, cultural news editor at Newsweek and The Daily Beast, and Jay Rosen, professor of journalism at New York University and author of PressThink, a weblog about journalism, about the sale and how the business model of media is changing as the industry tries to determine the cost of information.

Plus: President Obama laid out a plan Tuesday afternoon in Arizona to speed up the recovery of the housing market. The president’s proposals are aimed at helping homeowners afford a home, including allowing all homeowners to refinance and making it easier for responsible borrowers to get a mortgage. In order to prevent a crisis from happening again, the president also proposed reforming the mortgage finance system by gradually doing away with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and scaling back the government’s role. The new system would allow the private market to purchase loans from the banks and repackage them for investors. Heidi Moore, economics and finance editor for The Guardian, and Shahien Nasiripour, chief financial and regulatory correspondent at The Huffington Post, will join Ezra Klein to talk about the president’s proposals and the state of the housing recovery.

All In - All In Agenda

All In agenda: The sale of The Washington Post and the future of journalism

Updated