All In agenda: Sounding the drumbeat for military action in Syria

Updated
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry makes a statement at the State Department August 30, 2013 in Washington, DC. Kerry spoke on the current situation in Syria.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry makes a statement at the State Department August 30, 2013 in Washington, DC. Kerry spoke on the current situation in Syria.
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Watch All In with Chris Hayes Friday night for the latest on Syria’s chemical weapons attack and the expected U.S. military response. Secretary of State John Kerry laid out the U.S. rationale for intervening in Syria Friday afternoon, disclosing intelligence showing the attack was planned and executed by the Syrian regime. American intelligence put the death toll at over 1,400, including at least 426 children. Secretary Kerry argued strongly for intervention in the Syrian situation, emphasizing the importance of sending the message that the United States will not tolerate the use of chemical weapons.

“History is full of leaders who have warned against inaction, indifference, and especially against silence when it mattered most,” said Kerry. “Our choices then in history had great consequence, and our choice today has great consequences.”

Kerry’s remarks were reminiscent of former Secretary of State Colin Powell’s when he sounded the drumbeat for war ahead of the invasion of Iraq.

President Obama clarified Friday that he has still not made a final decision about what actions the U.S. military will take to enforce the global norm against using chemical weapons, but is looking at a “wide range” of options. None of the possibilities under consideration involve American boots on the ground or long-term involvement, according to the president.

The war-weary American public is divided on even a limited attack. An NBC News poll released Friday found 50% of Americans do not support U.S. intervention in Syria, and nearly 80% believe President Obama should consult with Congress before making a decision.

Chris Hayes will discuss the latest developments with Eli Lake, Senior National Security Correspondent for Newsweek/The Daily Beast, and P.J. Crowley, Fellow at The George Washington University Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication, Commentator for BBC and The Daily Beast, and former Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs. Bill Richardson, former Governor of New Mexico and former U.S. Ambassador to the UN, and former Rep. Tom Perriello, President and CEO of the Center for American Progress Action Fund, will also join the conversation.

All In agenda: Sounding the drumbeat for military action in Syria

Updated