The science of studying the atmosphere

 

All In traveled to Barrow, Alaska and to Boulder, Colorado to talk with the folks at NOAA about what’s going on in the Earth’s atmosphere and how they are gathering data on the rising greenhouse gases.

6/27/16, 9:47 PM ET

Measuring climate change in Barrow

Bryan Thomas, the Station Chief at NOAA’s observatory in Barrow, Alaska, shows All In the research facility and explains how they gather data.

6/27/16, 9:47 PM ET

How NOAA monitors climate change

Jim Butler, Director of Global Monitoring for NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, explains what data the ESRL monitors in order to gather information on the earth.

6/27/16, 9:47 PM ET

How humans impact climate change

Jim Butler, Director of Global Monitoring for NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, demonstrates some of the ways humans might be contributing to climate change.

6/28/16, 3:44 PM ET

The successes of the Montreal Protocol

There can be human-caused solutions to climate change. For example, the success of the Montreal Protocol means that concentrations of ozone-depleting gases are decreasing in the atmosphere, but it’s happening slowly, says NOAA research chemist Stephen

6/27/16, 9:47 PM ET

Tracking greenhouse gases in Barrow

“We’ve been experiencing the most abrupt change in carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere in the earth’s history,” says NOAA scientist Gaby Pétron, who is part of the team working at the observatory in Barrow.

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The science of studying the atmosphere