All In agenda: reaction to the Zimmerman trial verdict

Updated
A woman yells slogans with demonstrators supporting Trayvon Martin while marching to Times Square from New York's Union Square on July 14, 2013.
A woman yells slogans with demonstrators supporting Trayvon Martin while marching to Times Square from New York's Union Square on July 14, 2013.
Adrees Latif/Reuters

Watch All In with Chris Hayes tonight for the latest reaction to the Zimmerman trial verdict over the weekend. In cities across the country, protesters gathered and marched to express their desire for justice for Trayvon Martin. The Department of Justice has said that they are reviewing evidence in an ongoing civil rights investigation into Martin’s death. Speaking from Howard University in Washington Monday, Attorney General Eric Holder expressed concern about the outcome of the trial and hope that the country can use the opportunity to discuss the issues it has brought up. Michael Eric Dyson, msnbc Political Analyst and Professor at Georgetown University, Maya Wiley, civil rights attorney and Founder/President of the Center for Social Inclusion, Melissa Harris-Perry, Host of Melissa Harris-Perry on msnbc, Professor at Tulane University and Columnist at The Nation and Rep. Hakeem Jeffries of New York will join the table to discuss what can be learned from the trial and where people can channel their frustration over the outcome.

Later, in light of the Zimmerman trial, Chris Hayes will speak with Khary Lazarre White, Co-Founder & Executive Director of The Brotherhood/Sister Sol and Nicholas Peart, a Bronx resident and plaintiff in a lawsuit claiming stop-and-frisk is racially biased, about how suspicion is attached to young black men in America.

Plus: Chris Hayes will delve into the story of Marissa Alexander, an African-American woman at the center of another shooting case in Florida last year. Alexander was sentenced to 20 years in prison under a mandatory minimum sentencing law for firing what she described as warning shots during an argument with her husband. Rep. Corrine Brown of Florida, Barry Scheck, Director of the Innocence Project, Professor at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law and a lawyer who served on O.J. Simpson’s defense team and Jelani Cobb, Associate Professor at the University of Connecticut and columnist for The New Yorker, will join the table to discuss the racial double standard that exists in the justice system.

All In agenda: reaction to the Zimmerman trial verdict

Updated